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Published on May 30th, 1999 | by Gerry Galipault

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Velocette tries to make the best of a bad situation

It’s one step forward and two steps back for the British pop group Velocette.

The band’s “Fourfold Remedy” album (Wiiija/Beggars Banquet) made its U.S. debut on May 4, but rather than enjoy the moment and prepare for an American tour, singer Sarah Bleach, guitarist Sam Pluck, drummer Phil Sutton and bassist Jax Coombes are saddled with finding a new label back home.

Bleach says the band split with Wiiija, fed up with the lack of promotion.

“We’ve had a lot of trouble with Wiiija over the last year,” Bleach said recently. “We just had enough. First and foremost, we want to get ourselves another record deal here. Once that happens, what we gave up our jobs for in the first place, we can go on tour and see a bit of the world and have fun playing for people in America and Japan.

“Although it’s a setback leaving them, it’s a relief at the same time, because we won’t make the same mistakes again. We’ll make sure where we stand the second time around.”

Not being able to tour in support of “Fourfold Remedy” may have doomed any chances the album and the leadoff single, “Get Yourself Together,” had in the United States, but Bleach is buoyed by the favorable reviews she has read.

“The people who really liked it,” she said, “they seemed to see it the way we saw it, that we tried to do something different and try to mix big, upbeat pop songs with mellow, slow songs and create a whole picture on a record as well so every song had kind of a beginning and an end.”

Velocette frequently has been compared to British pop compatriots St. Etienne.

“We can see that, coming from the same background as Etienne,” Bleach said, “but most of the time we don’t personally think we sound like them. I can see how ‘Get Yourself Together’ did, since it’s ’60s-influenced, but generally speaking, a song like ‘Someone’s Waiting’ I don’t know how that can possibly be compared to Etienne. We confuse a lot of people by having different styles on the record and not turning out the same song.”

If given a chance, Bleach said, “I could see us doing well in the states. I think we could cross over. I don’t think we’re too English-sounding.”

In the meantime, the group will forge ahead, she said.

“We’re filled with a desire to prove everybody wrong. It’s one of those things where you don’t want to give up because to give up is what they would expect you to do. You just want to get to the point where you can turn around and say, ‘Fuck you, really.’ That’s my dream.”

BWF (before we forget): Get a load of Velocette on the Web @ www.beggars.com.

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About the Author

Gerry Galipault debuted Pause & Play online in October 1997. Since then, it has become the definitive place for CD-release dates — with a worldwide audience.



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