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Published on August 16th, 1998 | by Gerry Galipault

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Gloritone is getting in tune

Members of Phoenix’s guitar-driven pop trio Gloritone learned from past mistakes being in other bands: It’s all about the music, not keeping your eyes on the prize.

“We’ve been in different bands for the past six or seven years, did lots of shows,” singer-guitarist Tim Anthonise said recently. “When we got together, we decided basically not to try real hard like our other bands to get a record deal. Each band we had been in was always trying to get ahead.

“It seemed the less we tried, the more things fell into place. That’s been kind of our philosophy from the beginning. We weren’t trying to do anything. We thought, if people like our songs, great; if they don’t, fine.”

Fledgling label Kneeling Elephant was sold on Gloritone after hearing a demo and setting up a showcase in Los Angeles. The group’s debut album, “Cup Runneth Over,” distributed by RCA, was produced by Brad Cook (Foo Fighters, Counting Crows) and released June 30.

“Everybody’s story about how they got a record deal is different,” Anthonise said. “There’s definitely no one way to do it. People that do go out and work their butts off, it certainly has worked for a lot of people in the past. It just wasn’t our gig.

“What I do know is, this is going to be a slow build. That’s our preference, as far as sustaining any kind of career and making multiple records. That’s been our philosophy from the beginning, build slowly, don’t spend too much money where it’s not needed. Most of it goes to touring and not recording and not giving bonuses to the band just for signing a deal or buying lavish equipment. If we’re touring, we’re getting paid. If we’re sitting at home, we’re not getting paid.”

The first single is the relentless “Halfway,” but Anthonise, drummer Dan Lancelot and bassist Nick Scropos are at their witty and melodic best on such tuneful tracks as “John Wayne,” “Last Rites From the Coffee Table” and “Walking Dead.”

“Initially, you have your doubts after you’re in there recording,” Scropos said. “You hear the same songs over and over again and the way they were recorded, and then you start saying, ‘Oh, man.’ You start to lose your perspective. But we’re very happy with the way it turned out, and so far, at least a lot of stations have picked it up and are playing it. For a new band, that’s good enough.”

ON THE WEB: www.gloritone.com.

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Gerry Galipault debuted Pause & Play online in October 1997. Since then, it has become the definitive place for CD-release dates — with a worldwide audience.



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